The Best Gluten Free Flour For Pizza – Complete Guide


photo of balls of dough with flour on a wooden surface and the words "best gluten free flour for pizza dough"

The best gluten free flour for pizza has many claims, but which one stands above the rest? I have used a recipe adapted from Joy of Cooking that uses wheat-based flour o make all of the pizza in this experiment.

The best gluten free flour for Pizza Dough or Pizza Crust has been Caputo Gluten-Free Pizza Flour. The dough stretches are chewy and have the taste of regular pizza. However, since this gluten free flour mix uses deglutinated wheat starch, it may not suit everyone.

To figure this out, I have created a standard recipe adapted from Joy of Cooking which uses “regular” flour, also referred to as “all-purpose flour.” In other words, flour is made from wheat, containing high levels of gluten.

Ranking:

  1. Caputo Gluten Free Pizza Flour
  2. NGF All-Purpose Flour
  3. Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour Blend
  4. White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour
  5. King Arthur All Purpose Gluten Free Flour
  6. Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour
  7. XO Baking All-Purpose FLour Gourmet Blend
  8. Brown Rice Flour
  9. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix
  10. Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix
  11. Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almond Flour
  12. Corn Flour (Masa)

Follow the links for each flour to find out how it did in all recipes and the best way to use each one!

I tested as many gluten free flour blends as I could get my hands on using the same gluten free pizza crust recipe. See the rest of this page for information on how well each flour worked.

How Gluten Free Flours Work For Gluten Free Pizza Crust

Some results were surprisingly good, others remarkably awful. This variety in itself wasn’t a shock as gluten free flour widely varies in the results it gives.

It’s essential to find the best flour blend for each project with gluten free flour. Since we aren’t using gluten-containing products, carefully calculated mixes are needed for each use.

In my experience with gluten free baking, the mixture needs much more water than gluten versions. The gluten in the dough allows the dough to stretch and rise with all-purpose wheat flour. Gluten free flour doesn’t have this quality and needs the extra moisture to give the dough flexibility and rise.

I needed to change the amounts of water added to allow the dough to come together and form properly.

For most recipes, I am sticking strictly to the recipe amounts, but for pizza dough, I will be flexible with how much water I add so I may get an actual dough, witness the dough’s rise, and see how it bakes.

If I stayed strictly with the recipe as written, it would not credit any of the flour mixes.

To thoroughly examine each flour and how it performs, I used the following metrics:

  1. Dough Texture
  2. Dough Rise
  3. Pliability
  4. Rise While Baking
  5. Texture While Hot
  6. Texture After In Fridge 24 Hours
  7. Texture After Room Temp 24 Hours
  8. Taste
  9. Visual Appeal
  10. Sturdiness

See below for more details for more information on how the flours ranked for each metric. You can also visit the post I wrote on the best gluten free flour for more recipes we tried. Follow the links from each flour to find how it stacked up against other brands for each recipe test.

Dough Texture Of Gluten Free Pizza Dough

Gluten free flour does not tend to come together in a ball, but the recipes instead call for more of a batter-like consistency. So the expectation is that we will see the batter-like consistency. However, ideally, we are looking for the tight dough ball to form while being pliable and not crumbling apart.

The amount of liquid each flour will absorb changes. This variability means you may add extra water to each recipe to bring the texture as close to the right consistency without going into a batter.

Here is how I ranked each flour for dough texture:

  1. Caputo Gluten Free Pizza Flour
  2. White Gold GLuten Free Bread Flour
  3. Navigating Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  4. King Arthur Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  5. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free 1:1 Flour
  6. Corn Flour (Masa)
  7. Great Value Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  8. XO Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  9. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix
  10. Bisquick Gluten Free Pancake and Baking Mix
  11. Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix with Almond Flour
  12. Brown Rice Flour

Caputo Gluten Free Pizza Flour The dough was crumbly and would not come together. Some blends required extra water to bring them together. But it didn’t need as much water added as some other flours. I added about 1/4 cup. It never came together as a dough ball but became a batter. Although it was sticking tightly together. The impression is very starchy.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour I didn’t need to add any additional water to allow the texture of the dough to come together and allow for it to rise. It stuck tightly in a ball as my Kitchen Aid mixer finished and quickly came out in a ball.

NGF All-Purpose Flour The dough was crumbly and would not come together. This flour blend required extra water to bring it together. I added about 1/3 cup of excess water. After I added extra water, it came together in a tight ball of dough that was still malleable.

King Arthur All-Purpose Gluten Free Flour The dough was crumbly and would not come together. The flour blend required extra water to bring it together. I added about 1/3 cup of excess water. It became a batter rather than a ball of dough.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free 1:1 Flour I added an additional 1/2 cup of water to this mixture because it was very crumbly. However, after it came together, the dough formed was very lovely.

Corn Flour (Masa) While I anticipate further issues with this dough, later on, the texture of the dough was very nice and easy to work with and came together quickly after adding sufficient water. I did need to add 3/4 cup of water.

Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour The dough was crumbly and would not come together. The dough required extra water to bring it together. I added about 1/3 cup of excess water. It came together as a batter and not a ball of dough.

XO Gluten Free All-Purpose Flour I needed a surprising amount of extra water – double what the recipe noted. After looking at the ingredients, I knew that the dough would need it due to the coconut flour and high starches. It came together in a ball, though, and came out easily from the mixer.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix I added 1/2 cup of water to this mixture to stay together and not crumble. I needed to be sure that it was soft enough to get some rise. In the end, it came out of the mixer in a ball and didn’t create any issues.

Bisquick Gluten Free Pancake and Baking Mix After it finally came together; the texture was somehow crumbly and sticky at the same time. I didn’t want any less liquid, or I was afraid the dough wouldn’t rise, but it would have been a batter if I had added additional water.

Pamela’s Baking Mix With Almond Flour While I didn’t need to add any additional water, the texture of the dough left much for improvement. I disassembled my mixer and scraped down the sides to get the batter out. It resembled the texture of the macaron mixture for piping it.

Brown Rice Flour I hesitate to call this mixture “dough” as it resembled batter more than anything else. I needed to add extra water, and I did it a little at a time. I anticipate that this is due to being a single flour and not a mixture.

Flour BrandAmount of Extra Water Added
Caputo Gluten Free Pizza Flour1/4 cup
Navigating Gluten Free AP Flour1/3 cup
Great Value Gluten Free All Purpose Flour1/3 cup
King Arthur All Purpose Flour1/3 cup
White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flournone
Pamela’s Baking Mix With Almond Flournone
XO All Purpose Gluten Free Flour2/3 cup
Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix1/2 cup

Gluten Free Pizza Dough Rise

Getting gluten free flour to rise can be extremely tricky. The purpose of what we are doing here is to replace “regular” flour in recipes with a gluten free flour blend while maintaining the recipe’s integrity.

Gluten-free flour does not have the elasticity that gluten gives “regular” flour. This extra water comes into play with rising. Gluten free dough usually requires a looser or stickier dough with higher water content to rise.

Yeast reacts with sugar to produce gas. The dough traps this gas in, stretching it and forming air pockets inside the dough. These pockets create light and airy dough and bread. Since gluten free flour doesn’t pull as easily, this can create a denser end product.

Here is how we ranked the flours for dough rise:

  1. Caputo Gluten Free Pizza Flour
  2. Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour
  3. White Gold GLuten Free Bread Flour
  4. Brown Rice Flour
  5. King Arthur Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  6. Great Value Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  7. Bisquick Gluten Free Pancake and Baking Mix
  8. Navigating Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  9. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix
  10. XO Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  11. Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix with Almonds
  12. Corn Flour (Masa)

Caputo All Purpose Gluten Free Flour The consistency of this dough was odd. It was very starchy and sticky and appeared like batter consistency. But when I scraped it off the side of the bowl, it came together in a ball. This one seemed to have a stretchy dough, and while it did not double in size, it did increase in volume by a noticeable amount.

Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour The rise achieved with this flour was amazing. Not only did it rise significantly on the initial rise, but it rose and bubbled after it was rolled out and allowed to rise more.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour While it didn’t double, even given extra time, it did have the poofy appearance of a yeasty dough mixture. After allowing it to rise again after rolling it out, it created some nice air pockets.

Brown Rice Flour While there will be issues in other places with this flour, the rise is something it ranks highly. Not only did it rise well during the first rise, but after it was on the pizza pan, it rose and bubbled well while it was allowed to sit again.

King Arthur All Purpose Gluten Free Flour This dough created a batter when mixed. It was, therefore, a looser dough that should have allowed it to rise. And while the yeast was active with visible bubbles, it did not double in size.

Great Value All Purpose Flour This dough created a batter that should have allowed it to rise and create air pockets. While it did rise some and the air bubbles were visible, it did not double in size.

Bisquick Gluten Free Pancake and Baking Mix There were visible air bubbles in the dough after its first rise, but the crust did not have visible bubbles after it was rolled out and allowed to rise.

NGF All-Purpose Flour This dough balled up when mixed and was tight. It did rise and create some air in it, but it did not double as it should have.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix The flour was grainier than I anticipated for a pizza mix, which hindered its rise with the yeast. There was some movement, and some air pockets formed after rolling it out and allowing a second rise.

XO Gluten Free All Purpose Flour I had anticipated this would have a better rise to it. It rose some to become soft, but there were no apparent air bubbles after it was rolled and allowed to rise.

Pamela’s Baking Mix With Almond Flour The texture of this dough was very grainy, and the almond flour was evident. It did not rise noticeably during the first or second when it was rolled out on a pizza pan and allowed to sit for additional time.

Corn Flour (Masa) This had no visible rise in either the first or second rise.

Pliability Of Gluten Free Pizza Dough

The expectation of pizza dough with “regular” flour, i.e., wheat, gluten, etc., is to stretch the dough out via rolling pin or hands and transfer it to a baking sheet or rack.

However, gluten free flour just doesn’t behave the same. So I am not expecting to be able to stretch the dough and transfer it, but I will try doing it for each flour I try as part of judging which flour is the best.

Here is how we ranked the flour for pliability:

  1. Caputo Gluten Free Pizza Flour
  2. Navigating Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  3. Corn Flour (Masa)
  4. White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour
  5. Great Value Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  6. King Arthur All Purpose Flour
  7. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Flour
  8. Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour
  9. XO Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  10. Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almonds
  11. Brown Rice Flour

Caputo All Purpose Gluten Free Flour Well, I’m impressed! Not only was I able to roll it out, but I was able to stretch it out to the correct diameter, then I was able to transfer it in one piece without breaking or even folding it. I haven’t worked with dough like that since before I went gluten free. Once I got it on the sheet, I could stretch it to the sides, and it was shrinking it, just like working with dough containing gluten.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour I opted to press this into the pan instead of rolling it out. However, it was apparent that if I’d chosen to roll it out, it would have held together to transfer it to a baking sheet. I was very impressed with the texture.

King Arthur All Purpose Gluten Free Flour I’ll give this a “sort of” response. I was able to roll this dough out. And then I was able to transfer it. However, I could not move it without folding it up in quarters, like transferring a pie crust to a pan. When I unfolded it, I did have to smooth it out and press it into the pan.

Corn Flour (Masa) This was possible to roll and transfer, although it fractured and needed mending.

NGF All-Purpose Flour I could not roll this dough out and transfer it. I could roll it out, but when I tried to pick up a corner, it tore down the center.

XO Gluten Free All Purpose Flour I chose to press this into the pan instead of attempting to roll it out as I saw that it was rather sticky. However, I believe rolling would be possible if more flour were added and kneaded. It was too soft to transfer it to the pan, however.

Bisquick Gluten Free Pancake and Baking Mix This was too sticky to roll out, so I pressed it into the pan. There is no way it could have been rolled out and still be soft enough to rise if I kneaded flour into it.

Great Value All-Purpose Gluten Free Flour Not only was I unable to transfer this dough; I couldn’t even roll it out. It was too sticky to even press it out without pouring olive oil over the entire dough and my hands. It was challenging to manipulate.

Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour Would not be rolled, let alone moved. I had to press it into the pan.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix I am usually a big fan of Bob’s Red Mill products, but this one continues to disappoint. It was too sticky to roll it out, and I had to add extra flour to press it into the pizza pan for a second rise and par-bake it.

Pamela’s Baking Mix With Almond Flour This mixture was sticky even after adding extra flour to press it into the pan. It was challenging working with it.

Brown Rice Flour I couldn’t even roll this one out. I couldn’t even use my fingers coated in olive oil to press it. I used a rubber spatula coated in oil to push it into the pan.

Gluten Free Pizza Dough Rise While Baking

Gluten free flour has different rules for rising no matter what you are using to create that rise.

I used a recipe that solely uses yeast as a rising agent for this pizza dough. There is no baking powder, baking soda, or eggs.

The lack of a rising agent means that we go back to the elasticity of the flour. One thing you can do to improve the rise is to ensure that the top of the dough is moist. You can do this with oil or water spread with a pastry brush or hands. Letting the dough sit and rise can cause it to dry out, so doing this will help.

Here is how we ranked the gluten free flours for rising while baking:

  1. Caputo Gluten Free Pizza Flour
  2. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free 1:1 All Purpose Flour
  3. White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour
  4. King Arthur Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  5. Navigating Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  6. Great Value Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  7. Bisquick Gluten Free Pancake and Baking Mix
  8. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix
  9. XO Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  10. Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix with Almond Flour
  11. Brown Rice Flour
  12. Corn Flour (Masa)

Caputo All Purpose Gluten Free Flour It rose while resting after rolling it out and transferring it to the pizza pan. I brushed it with olive oil and sat for an additional hour. It rose noticeably in that time and rose more while in the oven.

Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour I was impressed with how it rose while it baked. It did something I have rarely seen gluten free flours do – it smoothed out the creases while baking. Usually, gluten free flour increases the cracks in the flour during baking.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour This rose after being pressed into the pan, but it also rose nicely in the oven. It gives every indication of creating an airy pizza crust.

King Arthur All Purpose Gluten Free Flour It rose while resting and created air pockets between the dough and the pan. I released the air pockets before par-baking it to avoid deformed pizza crust with toppings. It rose a little in the oven, but not significantly.

NGF All-Purpose Flour Rose beautifully pressed into the pizza pan and brushed with olive oil. I allowed it to sit an additional hour before par-baking it. In the oven, it rose slightly more, but not significantly.

Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour It rose while resting after being pressed into the pan and brushed with olive oil. It had a lot of bubbles all over the dough. It did not rise any further in the oven.

Bisquick Gluten Free Pancake and Baking Mix It rose and kept a good structure. But it wasn’t exceptional.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix The course texture of the flour resulted in less rise as a dough, but it did rise decently in the oven.

XO Gluten Free All Purpose Flour There was no apparent rise in the oven; the pizza only indicated the doneness by touching the cooked crust and feeling it.

Pamela’s Baking Mix With Almond Flour There was no noticeable rise in this crust at any stage, and if I hadn’t used the same yeast for the other flours, I would question if the yeast was even working.

Brown Rice Flour I was surprised this one didn’t rise much, if at all, in the oven. It rose nicely during the first and second rises, but not after being put in the oven.

Corn Flour (Masa) There was no rise in the oven; the oven only appeared to dry the dough out.

The Texture Of Gluten Free Pizza

The texture of gluten free pizza will vary widely based on the recipe you use and the flour blend you choose.

The recipe I am using in this article is straightforward without eggs, baking powder, baking soda, or other ingredients that would contribute to the texture. This lack of rising agent means it is all down to the flour blend and the yeast. I did this on purpose to give a good comparison between flour blends using bare-bones recipes.

Here is how we ranked the gluten free flour blends for texture only for gluten free pizza:

  1. Caputo Gluten Free Pizza Flour
  2. White Gold GLuten Free Bread Flour
  3. NGF All Purpose Flour
  4. Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour
  5. King Arthur All Purpose Flour
  6. Great Value Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  7. Brown Rice Flour
  8. XO Baking All-Purpose Flour Gourmet Blend
  9. Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix
  10. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix
  11. Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almond Flour
  12. Corn Flour (Masa)

Caputo All Purpose Gluten Free Flour We were very impressed with this pizza texture! I haven’t eaten anything like it since going gluten free, at least not without added ingredients like eggs, xantham gum, baking powder, etc. The crust bulged on the outside, and the texture was crumbly, spongey, and chewy.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour The texture was so great on this one that some people thought this was the one that had gluten free wheat starch in it! That’s some high praise for a rice-based blend.

Navigating Gluten Free All Purpose Flour It had some air pockets and sponginess and has received some high praise, even during blind testing. While the texture of the dough is a little lower, the end product came out great.

Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour This one came out very similarly to the NGF one. However, they both needed extra time in the oven to get the texture right, and they were both one of my favorites.

King Arthur All Purpose Gluten Free Flour This one came out gummy. We did make a mistake with baking this one and underbaked it significantly. We put it back in the oven, and then the texture improved immensely.

Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour The crunchiness of the texture is what surprised me here. The olive oil I brushed on to keep the surface from drying out during the proofing stage made the outside crunchy, and the inside was spongy and pleasant like a pizza crust should be. It is worth noting that we accidentally overbaked this one. I would recommend increasing the bake time of this pizza to 20 minutes.

Brown Rice Flour The texture was surprisingly good! It was a little crumbly, so if I did it again, I’d add some xanthan gum or tapioca starch to help bind it a little better, but this turned out much better than I anticipated it would for a single flour.

XO Baking All-Purpose Flour Blend The texture on this one was ok. I didn’t know what to expect with this blend, but I think the coconut worked against it the most.

Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix This one crumbled too much after it was par-baked to bake as a whole pie, but I pieced it together and cooked it up. The texture was pretty lovely but extremely crumbly when cooled down.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix This one was a coarse texture, but it did hold together. However, I can’t recommend it for one of the better pizza textures, as even their 1:1 blend thoroughly beats it.

Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almond Flour After par-baking it, the crust crumbled apart. I pieced it together and baked it, but it crumbled and didn’t resemble a typical pizza crust even when hot.

Corn Flour (Masa) Some people enjoyed this one a lot; others hated it! Masa wasn’t designed to allow for a nice rise and is supposed to crumble or be firm.

How Gluten Free Pizza Maintain Its Texture after 24 Hours On The Counter

Gluten-free pizza can be great out of the oven, but the real test is 24 hours later, like other gluten free baked goods.

Many gluten free bread will become dry and crumbly, just about inedible after allowing them to sit out.

To test this, I put a pizza crust in a plastic resealable bag and allowed it to sit sealed on the counter for 24 hours. Then we tried it by pulling it apart. We did not eat them as our pizzas had meat, and we didn’t want to risk it.

Here is how we ranked the flour blends for texture at room temperature:

  1. Caputp Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  2. Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour
  3. White Gold GLuten Free Bread Flour
  4. NGF All Purpose Flour
  5. King Arthur All Purpose Gluten Free Flour
  6. Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour
  7. XO Baking All-Purpose FLour Gourmet Blend
  8. Brown Rice Flour
  9. Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix
  10. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix
  11. Corn Flour (Masa)
  12. Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almond Flour

Caputo Gluten Free All Purpose Flour After sitting out, the crust sprang back when pressed. It was firmer than when it was fresh out of the oven while maintaining the internal structure.

Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour This was slightly soft when pressed but noticeably more dense than when hot.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour Slightly soft to the touch but easily crumbled when handled.

NGF All Purpose Flour After sitting at room temperature overnight, the crust became dense and crumbly. When I broke it in half, it crumbled apart.

King Arthur All Purpose Gluten Free Flour It was hard and dense after sitting on the counter for 24 hours, although it did have a little give still.

Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour When it sat on the counter overnight, it became dense on the inside. The outside was still hard.

XO Baking All-Purpose Flour Gourmet Blend I believe that the coconut flour made it so crumbly after sitting at room temperature overnight.

Brown Rice Flour When it cooled down, the brown rice flour became extremely crumbly and didn’t hold together at all.

Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix When cooled down, this one poorly crumbed both after being par-baked and after being cooked and allowed to sit.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix The coarse texture of this blend turned into little crumbles after sitting.

Corn Flour (Masa) As expected, this crumbled after cooling down on the counter.

Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almond Flour This didn’t hold together at all after cooling down, but it did better on the counter than in the fridge.

Texture Of Gluten Free Pizza after 24 Hours In The Fridge

Sometimes the fridge can ruin gluten free bread products. They can solidify and get rock hard.

The question here is two parts: what is the texture like if you want to eat the pizza cold, and what is the texture like if you refrigerate it and then warm it in the microwave.

To answer this, we refrigerated pizza slices for 24 hours and then ate them cold and warmed them up in the microwave to test the texture.

Here is how we ranked the flour blends for texture after in the fridge for 24 hours and reheated in the microwave:

  1. Caputo Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  2. White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour
  3. NGF All Purpose Flour
  4. Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour
  5. King Arthur Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  6. Great Value Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  7. XO Baking All-Purpose Flour Gourmet Blend
  8. Brown Rice Flour
  9. Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix
  10. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix
  11. Corn Flour(Masa)
  12. Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almond Flour

Caputo Gluten Free All Purpose Flour After being in the fridge, it became quite dry. Once heated, microwave, the outside remained hard, but inside became chewy like out of the oven.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour While it stiffened up more in the fridge than when left on the counter, but after microwaving, it turned back into almost the same texture as fresh.

NGF All Purpose Flour After 24 hours in the fridge, it turned dense and crumbly. It almost had a pie crust-like consistency. It softened up nicely into a chewy pizza crust when I microwaved it.

Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour While it was crumbly when heated back up, it turned back into a nice texture.

King Arthur Gluten Free All Purpose Flour The fridge caused it to become rigid and crumbly. After reheating, it got softer again but also became gummy.

Great Value Gluten Free All Purpose Flour After being in the fridge for 24 hours, it got tough and chewy. After I microwaved it, it did not have a pleasant taste or texture. It became chewy and gummy. The flavor was a combination of the flour and olive oil that it put off.

XO Baking All-Purpose Flour Gourmet Blend This was pretty firm when left in the fridge overnight and turned crumbly. When I reheated it, it didn’t regain its texture when fresh.

Brown Rice Flour This was great when fresh, but after in the fridge, it became extraordinarily crumbly and didn’t regain the texture after being reheated.

Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix This became extremely crumbly in the fridge, just like at room temp. However, when I reheated it, it regained the texture from fresh very nicely.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix The fresh texture was dry and textured. This texture only increased after an overnight in the refrigerator. Reheating it didn’t do any favors as the texture was still coarse.

Corn Flour (Masa) This flour is not meant to maintain a soft structure, and it shows. It is very crumbly and not flexible at all when refrigerated overnight. Reheating it made it more delicate, but it still didn’t do well.

Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almonds This one was too crumbly to even move the crust alone after being par-baked. After cooking it and cooling it overnight, the texture was still crumbly and couldn’t be easily moved, and was still coarse. Heating it helped slightly, but not much.

Gluten Free Pizza Crust Taste

When we eat something, we experience it with multiple senses. We have the texture, the taste, and the look of our food. The texture and the look significantly impact how it tastes, but I will try to separate it out and only talk about the taste of the pizza here.

Here is how we ranked the flour blends for taste:

  1. Caputo All Purpose Gluten Free Flour Blend
  2. White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour
  3. NGF All Purpose Flour
  4. Brown Rice Flour
  5. Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour
  6. Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour
  7. King Arthur Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
  8. Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix
  9. XO Baking All-Purpose Flour Gourmet Blend
  10. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix
  11. Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almond Flour
  12. Corn Flour (Masa)

Caputo All Purpose Gluten Free Flour Blend This one tasted like authentic pizza in a way that anything made without wheat cannot. We need to remember that this contains wheat starch as the primary ingredient, so it lends the authentic flavor of pizza to it.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour This flour blend convinced some people that the taste and texture meant that it contained wheat. But it does not. The taste was great and turned out better than anticipated.

NGF All Purpose Flour The taste of this one was excellent. It tasted as pizza crust should taste.

Brown Rice Flour This is without a blend, just brown rice flour by itself to see how it worked. The texture could use a little help, but the flavor was very well received. Use something to help it bind together better.

Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour I’ve found this flour blend to work in various ways very well. I was surprised by how well it performed against the brand’s pizza flour. And the taste turned out pretty well.

Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour There was nothing special about the taste of this pizza. The most notable thing was the texture. But it also did not taste bad.

King Arthur Gluten Free All Purpose Flour This one tasted like pizza but not significantly improved over other varieties of gluten free pizza based on taste alone.

Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix The taste was great for a blend that crumbled apart. But I had to put it further down the list because of the other issues.

XO Baking All-Purpose Flour Gourmet Blend The taste was ok, but I haven’t found a blend with coconut flour that turned out exceptionally well for flavor. But it wasn’t an awful coconut after-taste either.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix The texture impacted the taste, and its gritty-ness was not great. Overall, I’d use the 1:1 flour over this one for pizza in every category.

Gluten Free Pizza Crust Visual Appeal

We eat with our eyes and not merely our taste buds. It is vital to have our food look like we would expect it to experience it in a way that imitates the gluten-containing varieties.

Caputo Gluten Free All Purpose Flour This did look like “regular” pizza. The crust was bulging but not cracked. However, it was extremely white and did not start turning brown by 15 minutes in the oven. When fully baked, it was still very pale.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour The edges of the pizza folded over pretty nicely, giving it the visual appearance of “regular” pizza.

NGF All-Purpose Flour After the second rise and baking it, the crust dried out and started to crack apart. It is the classic look of gluten free bread products.

Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten Free Flour This looked like a typical gluten free pizza even though I tried to shape it well and help it look like pizza.

Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour As noted earlier, it was very crunchy, partly due to being overbaked. So this pizza had a dark color to it from the olive oil and thorough baking.

King Arthur Gluten Free All Purpose Flour When finished baking, it had just started to turn brown on the edges. So it did end up slightly pale. It had the classic cracked gluten free look to it.

XO Baking All-Purpose Flour Gourmet Blend This crust was falling apart and had large cracks. It also did not brown nicely as expected with pizza, but the ingredients of this blend are probably to blame.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix This was a rough mix and didn’t look even close to what we would expect a pizza to look like, even though I shaped it well.

Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix This crust crumbled after being par-baked, so the visual appeal tanked. It had to be pieced together to make a pizza that could be baked and didn’t resemble a pizza. However, the color and look were good in other respects.

Brown Rice Flour This had a little bit of an odd look to it. It was darker than typically expected, so the look was a little off.

Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almonds This one fell apart before I could thoroughly bake it and flecked with brown from the almond flour, so it looked different. It also had to be pieced together to be baked.

Corn Flour (Masa) Since this had a distinctive yellow color, everyone could tell it was not like a regular pizza.

Gluten Free Pizza Crust Sturdiness

Gluten free pizza is not known for being sturdy. My children think that everyone eats pizza with forks!

So the test here is whether you can pick up the piece of pizza and eat it with your hands without dropping the toppings all over the table. Or whether it needs and fork and knife to eat.

Caputo Gluten Free All Purpose Flour This was the easiest to pick up and eat. It had no bend while the dough remained soft on the inside.

White Gold Gluten Free Bread Flour It had a great structure and could be picked up and eaten as it should be.

Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pizza Mix While it failed in other areas, I have to give it credit for the structure, and it was able to be picked up as slices and eaten.

NGF All-Purpose Flour When it was first out of the oven and cut, it needed a fork to eat and couldn’t be picked up. However, as it cooled slightly, the dough stiffened up, and we could eat it with our hands.

Great Value All Purpose Gluten Free Flour This one held together very well and was crispy. It was easily able to be picked up and eaten.

King Arthur All Purpose Gluten Free Flour This needed a fork and knife to eat. It might have been easier to pick up if I had cooked it longer, but the inside may have gotten overbaked.

XO Baking All-Purpose Flour Gourmet Blend The crust turned out thin, and it didn’t stand up well to the pizza structure test.

Brown Rice Flour After it sat for a while, we could pick it up, but it was a little tricky because it did get so crumbly.

Corn Flour (Masa) While stiff, it could be picked up and eaten. However, it wasn’t pliable at all.

Bisquick Gluten Free Pancake and Baking Mix This one fell apart entirely and had to be pieced together to create a pizza. Consequently, it was not able to be picked up at all.

Pamela’s Baking and Pancake Mix With Almond Flour It fell apart and crumbled, so it had to be put together, and it wasn’t firm enough to eat with our hands. Not only that, but it was so crumbly that even if it had held together before being baked, it probably would have crumbled too much to be picked up anyways.

Fawn

My passion is supporting those who need to be gluten free. After my family had to transition to eating gluten free I realized how difficult it is. It is more than finding a recipe. It is about how to navigate social situations, deal with isolation, and other things that come along with it. I live in Oregon with my family, cats, and chickens.

Recent Posts