Gluten Free Breakfast Cereals (And Those That Are Not)


Gluten free breakfast cereals can be extremely difficult to find, especially when you start looking further into production, cross-contamination, and further details.

Breakfast cereals are only gluten free when they have a certified gluten free label. Cereals with a gluten free label but without a certified gluten free label should be questioned and looked into further. The most common ingredients that cause issues with gluten in cereal are malt, malt flavoring, oats, wheat, rye, and barley.

I have separated the status of how gluten free a product is on the scale found directly below. I have not listed any cereal as either “Gluten Free” or “Naurally Gluten Free” because you should always look for a gluten free label to ensure the breakfast cereal is safe.

Gluten Free. These items are gluten free without much concern of cross-contamination. Always check labels and ensure the product is gluten free. The items listed with this label can usually be eaten safely without a gluten free label. Always use your best judgment.

Naturally Gluten Free. These items are naturally gluten free and are usually safe, but have a risk of cross-contamination. You should check the labels more closely, but the risk of these items is relatively low. I default to this option on most gluten free products.

Gluten Free Label Required. These items have a high risk of cross-contamination and should not be consumed without a gluten free label, indicating it has less than 20ppm gluten.

Assume Gluten. These are items where you should assume they contain gluten. They are items primarily made with gluten ingredients, but gluten free alternatives exist. These will be prominently labeled as gluten free if they are safe, and commonly have “gluten free” in the name of the product.

Always Contains Gluten. These items will always contain gluten and you should view these products as a giant stop sign on any ingredient label. Anyone who is gluten free (especially those diagnosed with Celiac Disease) should never eat any of these products.

While we make every effort to provide information that is as accurate as possible, companies frequently change their ingredients, production process, or facilities. Always make sure the food you are purchasing or consuming is gluten free for yourself. Check for gluten free certifications, look at the ingredients, and statements on the packaging of the product.

Homemade or food made in restaurants differs in how we need to verify the gluten free status. The best practice is to only eat food from a dedicated gluten free kitchen to ensure it is gluten free. However, this is not always possible. Ask questions on how they ensure food is gluten free.

To find dedicated gluten free restaurants and other businesses, check out the map finder. We verify each and every establishment to ensure it is in fact dedicated gluten free instead of relying on crowd-sourcing and other people’s opinions.

For information on how to cook for someone with Celiac Disease or who otherwise requires a medically necessary gluten free diet, read this article I wrote about the process. While it can seem overwhelming, these are the steps necessary to ensure food is gluten free. I assure you, those of us who require a gluten free diet appreciate the care and attention people put into this so we can enjoy being included.

Gluten Free. These items are gluten free without much concern of cross-contamination. Always check labels and ensure the product is gluten free. The items listed with this label can usually be eaten safely without a gluten free label. Always use your best judgment.

Naturally Gluten Free. These items are naturally gluten free and are usually safe, but have a risk of cross-contamination. You should check the labels more closely, but the risk of these items is relatively low. I default to this option on most gluten free products.

Gluten Free Label Required. These items have a high risk of cross-contamination and should not be consumed without a gluten free label, indicating it has less than 20ppm gluten.

Assume Gluten. These are items where you should assume they contain gluten. They are items primarily made with gluten ingredients, but gluten free alternatives exist. These will be prominently labeled as gluten free if they are safe, and commonly have “gluten free” in the name of the product.

Always Contains Gluten. These items will always contain gluten and you should view these products as a giant stop sign on any ingredient label. Anyone who is gluten free (especially those diagnosed with Celiac Disease) should never eat any of these products.

While we make every effort to provide information that is as accurate as possible, companies frequently change their ingredients, production process, or facilities. Always make sure the food you are purchasing or consuming is gluten free for yourself. Check for gluten free certifications, look at the ingredients, and statements on the packaging of the product.

Homemade or food made in restaurants differs in how we need to verify the gluten free status. The best practice is to only eat food from a dedicated gluten free kitchen to ensure it is gluten free. However, this is not always possible. Ask questions on how they ensure food is gluten free.

To find dedicated gluten free restaurants and other businesses, check out the map finder. We verify each and every establishment to ensure it is in fact dedicated gluten free instead of relying on crowd-sourcing and other people’s opinions.

For information on how to cook for someone with Celiac Disease or who otherwise requires a medically necessary gluten free diet, read this article I wrote about the process. While it can seem overwhelming, these are the steps necessary to ensure food is gluten free. I assure you, those of us who require a gluten free diet appreciate the care and attention people put into this so we can enjoy being included.

In this article I have marked anything with wheat in red, anything without wheat but known to not be gluten free in grey, and gluten free cereals in yellow.

Cross-contamination in breakfast cereal is notoriously common. For this reason, it is vital to check for a certified gluten free label on every breakfast cereal and not just check the ingredients list.

In addition, some gluten free cereals contain a label from the company but are not certified gluten free. There is a possibility they do not test every batch, they may also average results from multiple batches. In this way, there is a possibility that a box of cereal labeled gluten free by the company and not by a certification could contain greater than 20ppm gluten.

Use the table of contents below to skip to the entry you are looking for, or simply scroll down the page to browse. Cereals are listed in alphabetical order. SourceOpens in a new tab.

For gluten free information on other types of food, check out my gluten free reference guide.

All Bran

All Bran is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. All Bran should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Apple Cinnamon Chex

Apple Cinnamon Chex is naturally gluten free and contains a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Apple Cinnamon Chex so the gluten free label is necessary.

Apple Jacks

Apple Jacks is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Apple Jacks should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Apple Raisin Crisp Cereal

Apple Raisin Crisp is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Apple Raisin Crisp should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Bran Flakes

Bran Flakes is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Bran Flakes should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Cap’n Crunch

Cap’n Crunch is not usually gluten free. However, it does not usually contain wheat. The only time Cap’n Crunch should be considered gluten free is if it contains a certified gluten free label. Otherwise, it should not be consumed by anyone on a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Cheerios

Cheerios is naturally gluten free but does not contain a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Cheerios so always check for the certification.

Chocolate Chex

Chocolate Chex is naturally gluten free and contains a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Chocolate Chex so the gluten free label is necessary.

Cinnamon Chex

Cinnamon Chex is naturally gluten free and contains a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Cinnamon Chex so the gluten free label is necessary.

Cinnamon Toast Crunch

Cinnamon Toast Crunch is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Cinnamon Toast Crunch should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Cookie Crisp

Cookie Crisp is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Cookie Crisp should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Corn Bran

Corn Bran is not usually gluten free. However, it does not usually contain wheat. The only time Corn Bran should be considered gluten free is if it contains a certified gluten free label. Otherwise, it should not be consumed by anyone on a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Corn Chex

Corn Chex is naturally gluten free and contains a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Cinnamon Chex so the gluten free label is necessary.

Corn Flakes

Corn Flakes is not usually gluten free. However, it does not usually contain wheat. The only time Corn Flakes should be considered gluten free is if it contains a certified gluten free label. Otherwise, it should not be consumed by anyone on a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Corn Pops

Corn Pops is not usually gluten free. However, it does not usually contain wheat. The only time Corn Pops should be considered gluten free is if it contains a certified gluten free label. Otherwise, it should not be consumed by anyone on a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Cranberry Almond Crunch

Cranberry Almond Crunch is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Cranberry Almond Crunch should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Cream of Wheat

Cream of Wheat is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Cream of Wheat should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Crispix

Crispix is naturally gluten free but doesn’t contain a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Cinnamon Chex so the gluten free label is necessary.

Crunch Berries

Crunch Berries is not usually gluten free. However, it does not usually contain wheat. The only time Crunch Berries should be considered gluten free is if it contains a certified gluten free label. Otherwise, it should not be consumed by anyone on a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Eggo Cereal

Eggo Cereal is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Eggo Cereal should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Fiber One Cereal

Fiber One Cereal is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Fiber One Cereal should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

French Toast Crunch

French Toast Crunch is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. French Toast Crunch should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Froot Loops

Froot Loops is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Froot Loops should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Frosted Flakes

Frosted Flakes is not usually gluten free. However, it does not usually contain wheat. The only time Frosted Flakes should be considered gluten free is if it contains a certified gluten free label. Otherwise, it should not be consumed by anyone on a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Frosted Mini-Wheats

Frosted Mini-Wheats is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Frosted Mini-Wheats should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Frosted Shredded Wheat

Frosted Shredded Wheat is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Frosted Shredded Wheat should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Fruity Pebbles

Fruity Pebbles is naturally gluten free but doesn’t contain a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Fruity Pebbles so the gluten free label is necessary.

Golden Grahams

Golden Grahams is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Golden Grahams should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Gorilla Munch

Gorilla Munch is naturally gluten free and has a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Gorilla Munch so the gluten free label is necessary.

Granola

Granola is naturally gluten free if the oats are purity protocol. To ensure granola contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in the granola so the gluten free label is necessary.

Grape-Nuts

Grape-Nuts is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Grape-Nuts should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Honey Bunches of Oats

Honey Bunches of Oats is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Honey Bunches of Oats should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Honey Nut Chex

Honey Nut Chex is naturally gluten free and has a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Honey Nut Chex so the gluten free label is necessary.

Honeycomb Cereal

Honeycomb Cereal is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Honeycomb Cereal should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Keebler Cereal

Keebler Cereal is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Keebler Cereal should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Kix

Kix is not usually considered gluten free. However, it does not usually contain wheat. The only time Kix should be considered gluten free is if it contains a certified gluten free label. Otherwise, it should not be consumed by anyone on a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Lucky Charms

Lucky Charms is naturally gluten free but doesn’t have a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Lucky Charms so the gluten free label is necessary.

Mini-Wheats

Mini-Wheats is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Mini-Wheats should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Muesli

Muesli is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Muesli should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Mueslix

Mueslix is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Mueslix should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Multi-Bran Chex

Multi-Bran Chex is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Multi-Bran Chex should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Nutri Grain Cereal

Nutri Grain Cereal is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Nutri Grain Cereal should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Ohs Cereal

Ohs Cereal is not usually gluten free. However, it does not usually contain wheat. The only time Ohs Cereal should be considered gluten free is if it contains a certified gluten free label. Otherwise, it should not be consumed by anyone on a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Pebbles Cereal

Pebbles Cereal is naturally gluten free but doesn’t have a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Pebbles Cereal so the gluten free label is necessary.

Puffed Rice

Puffed Rice is naturally gluten free but doesn’t have a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Puffed Rice so the gluten free label is necessary.

Raisin Bran

Raisin Bran is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Raisin Bran should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Reese’s Peanut Butter Puffs

Reese’s Peanut Butter Puffs is naturally gluten free but doesn’t have a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Reese’s Peanut Butter Puffs so the gluten free label is necessary.

Rice Chex

Rice Chex is naturally gluten free and has a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Rice Chex so the gluten free label is necessary.

Rice Krispies

Rice Krispies is not usually gluten free. However, it does not usually contain wheat. The only time Rice Krispies should be considered gluten free is if it contains a certified gluten free label. Otherwise, it should not be consumed by anyone on a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Shredded Wheat

Shredded Wheat is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Shredded Wheat should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Shreddies

Shreddies is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Shreddies should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Special K Cereal

Special K Cereal is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Special K Cereal should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Teddy Grahams

Teddy Grahams is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Teddy Grahams should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Toasties

Toasties is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Toasties should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Total Cereal

Total Cereal is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Total Cereal should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Trix

Trix is naturally gluten free but doesn’t have a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Trix so the gluten free label is necessary.

Vanilla Chex

Vanilla Chex is naturally gluten free and has a certified gluten free label. To ensure cereal contains less than 20ppm gluten, always check for a certified gluten free label. The company may change processes in manufacturing or the ingredients in Vanilla Chex so the gluten free label is necessary.

Wheat Chex

Wheat Chex is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Wheat Chex should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Wheaties

Wheaties is not gluten free and should never be consumed by anyone on a gluten free diet. Wheat is the main ingredient in this cereal, which is the primary red flag on an ingredient list that indicates the product is not gluten free. Wheaties should never be part of a medically necessary gluten free diet.

Fawn

My passion is supporting those who need to be gluten free. After my family had to transition to eating gluten free I realized how difficult it is. It is more than finding a recipe. It is about how to navigate social situations, deal with isolation, and other things that come along with it. I live in Oregon with my family, cats, and chickens.

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